THIS IS NORMAN BROKENSHIRE by Norman Brokenshire

THIS IS NORMAN BROKENSHIRE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An Unvarnished Self-Portrait, Norman Brokenshire calls his story of a life in which a career was built, lost and rebuilt in the face of alcoholism. In it he sketches a lonely, confused childhood under the hard hand of a minister-father ; the early struggle to make his way in the world; the immediate success as radio announcer in pioneer days; the hollowness of that success as it revealed itself in the insecurity that led always to rebellion and drink -- and dismissal; the terrible years from 1931 to 1944 when he was out of the running completely; the final spiritual cure and return to the top via Theatre Guild on the Air. We catch glimpses of radio as it grows, are in on inaugural coverages, meet some well known personalities such as Grace Moore, Bing Crosby, Mary Pickford. This is accompanied by a running narrative of falls into the alcoholic snakepit which become somewhat repetitive in their regularity. This is a sincere book, written with a special care for other sufferers of alcoholism, but while it emphasizes spiritual reprieve it does not seem to come to grips with the bases of the problem -- the loneliness and insecurity which seemingly led to drink. Norman Vincent Peale's foreword and Norman Brokenshire's reputation in radio may help to start the book on its journey to others in distress.

Pub Date: April 9th, 1954
Publisher: McKay