THE TRAGEDY OF APARTHEID: A Journalist's Experiences in the South African Riots by Norman Phillips

THE TRAGEDY OF APARTHEID: A Journalist's Experiences in the South African Riots

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Norman Phillips, a Toronto newspaper correspondent, flew to the Union of South Africa immediately after the Sharpeville massacre in March of this year. He spent several books studying that strife-torn country before he was expelled for reporting ""untruths"" to world. His book will reach the American public when the incidents about which he writes are still only a few months old. The names of persons and places encountered in the text ll ring fresh in the ears. This lends a curious immediacy to what he has to say--one can almost believe that one is reading his dispatches from the pages of any free press. But the depth of his reporting highlights many of the historical aspects of South African politics for which the newspapers rarely have time or space. This is a remarkably stirring, yet level-headed, analysis of the contemporary political situation in a country that advertises itself as an ally of the West, yet follows a strict white-supremacy line the results of which approach fanatical police-state methods.

Pub Date: Aug. 31st, 1960
Publisher: McKay