CREATOR, CREATION AND FAITH by Norman Young

CREATOR, CREATION AND FAITH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Recently, Young contends, theologians have shied away from the theme of creation, perhaps lest it mire them in silly debates with science about monkeys or big bangs. But his book demonstrates that ail religious life turns on the issue of divine creativity: it makes a profound difference if one affirms a transcendent source of all being, if that God has a plan for history and can break into it, and if we are called to participate freely in building a new earth. Young first distills the essential testimony of the biblical witness to God as the one who eternally brings being out of chaos, to man as God's fallible image, and to the promise of a new creation, with Christ as first fruit. Then he critically examines the ways this core of revelation is interpreted from the four distinct theological perspectives represented by Karl Barth, Paul Tillich, Rudolf Bultmann, and Jurgen Moltmann. The conclusion suggests that we live creatively, in the full theological sense, when we exist in the world as ""resident aliens,"" conscious of our finitude, critical of all secular pretensions to divinity, and dedicated to the divine aim of renewing the earth through the way of the cross. A fine, clear essay--though tough going at stretches for lay readers--it brings a vital theme back into theological currency.

Pub Date: Oct. 18th, 1976
Publisher: Westminster