THE HONEST POLITICIAN'S GUIDE TO CRIME CONTROL by Norval & Gordon Hawkins Morris

THE HONEST POLITICIAN'S GUIDE TO CRIME CONTROL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Assuming dictatorial power over criminal law and police procedures, Morris and Hawkins tell it like it ought to be, ticking off unambiguous ""ukases"" on the purposes, processes, and practical operations of the criminal justice system, then defending them piece by piece with cool, hard logic. Central to their cure is a more compact conception of crime: ""We must strip off the moralistic excrescences"" of the criminal law to ""concentrate on the essential""--namely, the protection of persons and property. This massive reappraisal would remove from the overextended purview of the public prosecutor such activities as drunkenness, narcotics and drug abuse, gambling, disorderly conduct and vagrancy, abortion, sexual behavior between consenting adults, and ""juvenile delinquency"" (re behavior which would not be criminal for an adult), thus relieving overtaxed policemen, courts, and correctional agencies of more than half their burden (and breaking the Underworld monopoly on a lot of lucrative business). With the ground cleared for action along more modest and realistic lines, the authors proceed with further bold proposals for restructuring and reform, including, of course, an extensive upgrading of the police role. They're big on gun control, down on capital punishment, and think organized crime is largely a myth. A guide with much good sense, but how many honest politicians are there, anyway?

Pub Date: Feb. 10th, 1969
Publisher: University of Chicago Press