DAWN OF THE EIGHTH DAY by Olga Ilyin

DAWN OF THE EIGHTH DAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is an extended, somewhat sprawling and semi-autobiographical saga of a Russian landowning family in the pentultimate days of czardom and during the first confused year of the great revolution - a family both educated and enlightened which suffered as fully as the rigid old guard that still mourns the passing of serfdom. The young daughter, Nita Ogarin, tells of her father and aunt who shared the beliefs of their famous neighbor Tolstoy, of her beautiful religious mother who died young, and of her own childhood and year as a debutante. She experienced an abortive romance with an older count, a strange marriage with a thick-headed hussar, then-during the revolution-motherhood and flight with a newborn baby. Drawn from a rich background, this is still obscure in its emotional and spiritual motivation and difficult for the average American reader.

Pub Date: May 28th, 1951
Publisher: Henry Holt