THE HORSE IN AMERICA by Olive Burt

THE HORSE IN AMERICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Olive Burt touches on all sorts of current concerns in her gallop through horstery. On women: ""They have dropped the name Equestriennes, preferring to be called Amazons."" On Indians, (alternately called ""natives""): Burt asserts that they should really be designated as ""Americans,"" though she, herself, uses that term's ""commonly accepted use as meaning European settlers of North America."" On ecology: ""Today the horse is helping to solve a number of scientific and ecological problems."" What are they? She doesn't say. Nor does the reader emerge with any basis for the author's conclusion that ""Undoubtedly the horse will again be put to the service of man in ways that have been neglected for the past 50 years."" From what can be gleaned from this hackneyed history, horses pulled harder than men, ran faster, worked and carried more, were braver in battle, and helped men (usually white) to cross and settle the country. Though she tries to show that the horse was there, too, as an unsung hero at most of the great happenings from American pre-history to the present, Butt gives us neither enough history of the horse nor of the nation to sustain interest through this superficial work.

Pub Date: April 10th, 1975
Publisher: John Day