OURAY THE ARROW by Olive Burt

OURAY THE ARROW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A serious and intensive fictionalization of the conscientious Ute leader's tragedy-dogged struggle to create friendship and peace between his people and the whites during the late 1800's. Not a chief of his tribe at first, Ouray had to use his influence as a strong warrior. His relationships further complicated by a part-Apache parentage, he was also hounded by criticisms from the government authorities he tried to help. Doing things like riding to warn settlers or other tribes of coming raids made his own kin distrust him; he had to witness the capture of his family by fierce Arapahoes; chieftancy when it finally came was lonely and, ironically, he was held hostage when his tribe pillaged. Among the whites who saw his virtue were Kit Carson and Lincoln but recognition was temporary and he died broken and dispirited and in the care of medicine men whose ways he had tried to change. Compare this with Shannon Garst's Chief Joseph of the Ne Perce for another thoughtful commentary on a distressing aspect of our history.

Pub Date: April 27th, 1953
Publisher: Messner