THE ADVENTURES OF CHESTER THE CHEST by Ora & Naomi Nakao Ayal

THE ADVENTURES OF CHESTER THE CHEST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

It's the merest fancy--but a likable, even lovable one, with minimal plain-Jane drawings to match. Elaine (straight hair, granny glasses, striped socks), at loose ends because ""her friend Mary had gone to Europe,"" goes to her chest (hulking, brown, double doors) and feels a drop on her hand. The chest is crying--he says, opening his drawer--because his friend Flora has gone to Europe. And, at Elaine's wondering-if, Chester lies down on his back and opens his doors, Elaine climbs in, he spreads the doors, winglike. . . and flies until they reach ""a small house,"" which Chester identifies (a masterstroke) as ""Europe."" Inside is Flora the armchair. The three dress up and play (with flowers in his drawer, Chester is a vase; with big shoes on her feet, Flora's a grandfather); next they dance; and then Elaine and Chester fly home--to stoke up for another journey tomorrow. Neither Chester the chest nor Flora the armchair is anthropomorphized--yet the power of emotive suggestion transforms them instantly into sentient beings. A wisp of deadpan drollery--conducive also to independent imaginative play.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1982
Publisher: Harper & Row