THE GREEN LEAVES OF SUMMER by Oriel Malet

THE GREEN LEAVES OF SUMMER

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

London, and the aspirations and frustrations of early years in a gentle, wistful and happily resolved story of young people. Among them you will meet Henry Crumbull, whose penchant for psychical research leads him to Lucy, whose remote and quiet loveliness wins his affections while her poltergeist, Terence, challenges his professional interests; Serena, who in transcribing the diaries of Oliver Haynes, killed during the war, falls in love with his image, later transfers that love to Robin, scarred physically and emotionally in the same action in which Oliver met his death; Pippit Archer, eleven and exploited by an older man in a cheap theatrical act, who runs away and is given her chance at the Academy of Dramatic Art and Ballet; Tatty, orphaned and unhappy under the tutelage of an aunt, who also runs away and secures her dream of attending the Academy; Paul, a refugee doctor, whose rather glum orientation to England is of course softened by the right girl; etc. etc. A deliberately demure and pleasantly inconsequential presentation which soothes, rather than stimulates, and which should find an appropriate audience.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1951
Publisher: Little, Brown