SALVATION IN HISTORY by Oscar Cullman

SALVATION IN HISTORY

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A foremost Swiss New Testament scholar takes up the discussion on one of the crucial questions in contemporary theological thought and undertakes to show how ""salvation history"" is central to New Testament faith. He admits that the term and the concept for which it stands are unacceptable to modern man, but he regards this as one more instance of the ""skandalon"" which the New Testament has always created vis-a-vis other philosophical systems and religions. New Testament proclamation demands a decision because it places our existence in a situation belonging inseparably to a divine history which has occurred, is occurring, and will go on occurring, and which intrudes upon us from a source outside mankind. In developing this thesis, Cullman reviews the position of other New Testament scholars, especially Bultmann, whom he finds so much in opposition to the concept of ""salvation history."" ""Salvation history"" is not to be confused with ""history"" in the sense in which that term is ordinarily used. The scholar may understand what meaning Cullman intends the words to convey, but the lay Christian will hardly be helped to comprehend what he has believed his faith to be, still less to know what meaning he now is to give to history as he experiences it in his own existence. The excuse of ""skandalon"" hardly makes up for this limitation.

Pub Date: Aug. 16th, 1967
Publisher: Harper & Row