THE DEVIL CAME ON SUNDAY by Oswald Wynd

THE DEVIL CAME ON SUNDAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A rather muted Scotch plaid has several social stripes in its patterning of the life of a village, Kilrudderie, from its first family to its doctor, Army officer, minister, down to those who work in the local industry there. More than the distinctions to be made, it is concerned with the slow, stubborn changes between generations- and the falling away from vested traditions. This is most true of Jock Innis, one of the new generation who will take over, a calculating young man with no ""soggy human values"" and dreams and schemes of expanding his father's prefab housing business. Others in the village have their problems: Colonel Fairway-Campbell, obsolescent old Army, and Hester who will soon die; the minister who is closer to his parishioners than his wife; Sheina, Jock's sister, who is to marry; etc., etc., and while there is no sharp drama- local matters come to a head when a new factory is proposed, at the expense of the school playing field, and a foreman, sacked, kills himself and his family...A likable story creates sympathetic characters and conflicts and should please a modest readership.

Pub Date: July 28th, 1961
Publisher: Doubleday