THE PROGRESSIVE YEARS by Otis-Ed. Pease

THE PROGRESSIVE YEARS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

America's breakthrough into social consciousness during the early 1900's shows signs of becoming a nostalgic favorite among the historians. A few months ago The Muckrakers gave us a first-rate evocation of that period; now editor Otis Pease has cannily selected a group of ""exposure"" pieces, all generally long, lucid and lively, which show American at the dawn of the 20th century when there was staggering poverty amidst a stunning prosperity and the industrial city exploded with immigrants and the oncoming technological revolution. People like Theodore Roosevelt and Wilson, Licoln Steffens and Eugene Debs, Lippmann and William James grace these pages, and their bristling indictments and moral concerns and progressive platforms makes compelling documents, whether they are talking about the Other Half in Canal Street slums, machine politics, urban corruption and commercial privilege, or the need for a new business ethos, ""the beginning of MAN"" and the influence of Darwin, Marx, Tolstoy and Shaw. A good representative round-up.

Pub Date: Sept. 24th, 1962
Publisher: Braziller