WONDERS OF MEASUREMENT by Owen S. Lieberg

WONDERS OF MEASUREMENT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With none of the theoretical clout of Gallant's Man the Measurer (p. 862, J-278) Lieberg surveys the history of measuring units and devices in separate sections on length (from the Sumerian cubit to today's precise meter definition by gas laser), capacity (modified through the centuries in response to the needs of wine traders), time (another recapitulation of clocks and calendars), speed (up to the supersonic mach), and the more complex topics (though never complicated here; indeed the underlying physical principles get short shrift beside the workings of various meters) of electricity, temperature, light, and sound. The different chapters are by no means parallel -- some emphasize history, others mechanics, etc. -- and Lieberg gives more attention to gadgets than to fundamental concepts (a final chapter entitled ""Measurement in Space"" is mostly a description of instruments used on the moon). On balance then, Wonders of Measurement is loosely informative, irregularly diverting, but oddly uncalibrated.

Pub Date: Oct. 2nd, 1972
Publisher: Dodd, Mead