THE UNCOLLECTED WODEHOUSE by P. G. Wodehouse

THE UNCOLLECTED WODEHOUSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A cheerfully variegated group of short stories, articles, and verse from 1900-1919, none of which has previously appeared in American compendiums. The initial articles are schoolboy flights for study-hall snorting: an item about Games Captaincy, for example, which contains ingredients of future masterworks in the bud: ""the keen and regular player. . . is a gem of purest rays serene."" Or the prospectus for a romance to succor those forced to wear glasses, entitled ""The Spectacles of Fate."" As for the stories, they're thin, but Plum's kind of thin--spider-web adhesive. Try to forget, if you can, the sacrifice of a swain who devours a playing-card sandwich to obliterate a loved one's gaffe at bridge, or a mystery featuring a cat and a harmonica. There's also an appearance by Jeeves' predecessor, one Reggs, who drops his haitches, along with samples of the once and future Wodehouse--""His resemblance to a stuffed trout, always striking, was subtly accentuated."" Early Plum pudding for the fancier.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1976
Publisher: Seabury