NOBODY ELSE CAN WALK IT FOR YOU by P. J. Peterson

NOBODY ELSE CAN WALK IT FOR YOU

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A one-dimensional encounter with menace on the trail. The menace is in the form of three motorcyclists who buzz up illegally to the wilderness site where Laura, an 18-year-old Y employee, is camping with seven teenage backpackers and an old-lady assistant. The three are invited to join in the campfire sing, but that doesn't defuse their taunts and troublemaking posture. One of the campers, Bev, complicates the problem by trying to sneak out in the night with one of the bikers. When the campers move on, the bikers follow. They turn up at the next overnight campsite and, becoming grimmer, they block the group's escape trail, throwing rocks and injuring the whiney Bev when the campers try to push through. Finally the campers maneuver a frightening ledge to the temporary safety of a cave, but they know the bikers will soon follow with rocks. At last they sneak away in the night, but the leading and most vicious biker tries to follow, breaking his leg in the process and then, just to show that he's mean clear through, hitting Laura with a rock when she turns the group back to help him. Peterson maintains a standard suspense level, but there are no startling developments and the characterization is perfunctory.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1982
Publisher: Delacorte