LOVE TO MAMÁ

A TRIBUTE TO MOTHERS

The warmth of family life, especially that of mothers, aunts, and grandmothers, pervades this delightful collection of poems by Latino writers from various national backgrounds. Some are funny, such as “The Race,” by Jennifer Trujillo, which tells the story of a great-grandmother who as a young girl won a horse race against all the fancy caballeros; and some bring tears, such as Carmen D. Lucca’s “I Helped My Mom Not to Be Late for Work.” Although the voices are Latino, the poems and the experiences they encompass will speak to all. As poet Rane Arroyo says, “Two languages make you a rich man.” Spanish words are freely sprinkled throughout the book, which includes a glossary and pronunciation key. Some of the contributors are long-time writers, but one is as young as 15. Ecuadorian illustrator Barragán’s bold illustrations (pencil, cut paper, and gouache, with some extra computer enhancement) are colorful and cheerful with contagious pink-lipped smiles on her characters. Handsome patterns reflect her background as a graphic artist and carpet designer. Abrazos (hugs) for Mora and all the contributors for this one. (author’s note, biographical sketches) (Picture book/poetry. 5-10)

Pub Date: April 15, 2001

ISBN: 1-58430-019-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Lee & Low Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2001

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

TEA WITH MILK

In describing how his parents met, Say continues to explore the ways that differing cultures can harmonize; raised near San Francisco and known as May everywhere except at home, where she is Masako, the child who will grow up to be Say’s mother becomes a misfit when her family moves back to Japan. Rebelling against attempts to force her into the mold of a traditional Japanese woman, she leaves for Osaka, finds work as a department store translator, and meets Joseph, a Chinese businessman who not only speaks English, but prefers tea with milk and sugar, and persuades her that “home isn’t a place or a building that’s ready-made or waiting for you, in America or anywhere else.” Painted with characteristic control and restraint, Say’s illustrations, largely portraits, begin with a sepia view of a sullen child in a kimono, gradually take on distinct, subdued color, and end with a formal shot of the smiling young couple in Western dress. A stately cousin to Ina R. Friedman’s How My Parents Learned To Eat (1984), also illustrated by Say. (Picture book. 7-9)

Pub Date: April 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-395-90495-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1999

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Less pathological than Love You Forever but aimed at the same audience.

ONE MORE HUG

The reassurance of “one more hug” allows a little boy to take on fears, new challenges, and responsibilities as he grows into an older boy, adolescent, and finally young man.

Graceful gouache paintings delineate a child’s progress, from coping with the fear of a storm and a broken toy through the first time on a school bus, growing older and learning to climb a tree, ride a bike, play soccer, training with the track team, and, ultimately, driving away to life on his own. All the while, Mama is there to provide support and love, always with a special hug. Related in the past tense by Mama, the narrative reflects a nostalgic remembrance yet conveys the constant unbreakable bond between mother and child. “But even though you were older, you were still my boy. And you asked for… // one more hug before your big performance.” In a final sentimental reflection, Mama wonders if her now-adult son understands her pride and love for him and is happily rewarded with a surprise visit and “one more hug.” Children will enjoy reviewing the relatable illustrations of a growing child’s activities; however, it’s parents who will undoubtedly identify with the emotions. According to the author’s note, the intent is to assure parents that sons should be allowed to express their feelings. Both Mama and son are white.

Less pathological than Love You Forever but aimed at the same audience. (Picture book. 5-10)

Pub Date: Nov. 12, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5344-2971-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Aladdin

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more