CLIMBING JACOB'S LADDER: The Arrival of Negores in Southhern Politics by Pat & Reese Cleghorn Watters

CLIMBING JACOB'S LADDER: The Arrival of Negores in Southhern Politics

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Coming after a series of polemical works by Negro writers and by Northern liberals, this carefully written history of the golden years of the civil rights movement provides the facts and the overview necessary to make judgements on the successes and failures of one of the great social revolutins in this nation's experience. Drawing on the fields of the interracial and respected Southern Regional Council, the authors take us back to the 1955-56 Montgomery bus boycott thorough the epic year of 1960 when Negro college students began their hopelessly brave ""sit-ins"" that eventually resulted in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. After that, in the early monts of 1966, the movement faltered, with backlash, frustration, Watts, and ""black power"" as the painful logic. The book records the knaves and heroes of these years, the red-neck sheriffs and the kids who went into the Black Belt to urge frightened Negroes to register for the vote and to teach illustrate folk living in the hollows that there for the vote and to teach illustrate folk living in the hollows that there might be a road into the American dream. The authors go beyond history to give a superb profile of the many Negro organizations that worked the Rights field and the sociological outlook that informed their labors.

Pub Date: Nov. 8th, 1967
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World