THE HOMESTEADING RECIPE BOOK by Patricia Crawford

THE HOMESTEADING RECIPE BOOK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Two well-planned, thoroughly attractive cookbooks. Crawford (Homesteading, 1975) writes for new country-dwellers trying to meet seasonal vagaries with maximum self-reliance; Burrows and Meyers' theme is rescue measures for the overambitious gardener facing a vegetable invasion. But both should do well among city folk. Burrows and Meyers believe in dishes made with a few sound ingredients and unfussy, intelligent preparations. They are not above pleasant practical stopgaps, but most of their asparagus-to-turnips survey shows how versatile honest vegetables and simple from-scratch methods can be: stir-fried broccoli, carrot ""vichyssoise,"" ratatouille pizza, a Lithuanian baked potato pancake. Crawford covers part of this territory in the same spirit, but also provides ""winter"" recipes stressing rice, legumes, and pasta as well as a good selection of egg, poultry, and inexpensive meat dishes--e.g., a chilled egg loaf and a chicken corn soup with Pennsylvania Dutch ""rivels."" There are also some gardening suggestions and a long section on pickles and preserves. Witty and Wolf's Garden-to-Table Cookbook is a third contender more geared to the gardening end of things (p. 582). It is impossible to recommend one of these three beauties over the others, except in terms of price.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1976
Publisher: Macmillan