EARTHQUAKES: New Scientific Ideas About How and Why the Earth Shakes by Patricia Lauber

EARTHQUAKES: New Scientific Ideas About How and Why the Earth Shakes

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With the dramatic but not unduly dramatized opening example of the 1964 disaster in Alaska, Lauber sets the stage for a brisk, uncomplicated discussion of earthquakes and tsu-nami, (commonly, tidal waves). A 1923 quake in Tokyo Bay introduces the Pacific ""Ring of Fire,"" a mystery whose gradual solution readers will follow with unwavering interest; and specific California quakes, especially the famous one in San Fancisco in 1906, are worked into an uncommonly clarifying explanation of what's going on along the San Andreas fault. New findings from the developing field of plate tectonics are utilized throughout, and the author's consistently felicitous analogies make it all strikingly clear to even the least science-minded of intermediate grade students.

Pub Date: Oct. 9th, 1972
Publisher: Random House