ALIVE AND FAT AND THINNING IN AMERICA by

ALIVE AND FAT AND THINNING IN AMERICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A slim volume from the Formerly Fat Psychiatrist, which modifies some of his earlier theories to square with modern findings and revised opinions. Rubin contends that society victimizes fat people, that there are personal differences between ""fats"" and ""thins,"" and that fat people may have greater capacities for happiness which are jeopardized by weight loss. He rattles on quite amiably and uncritically about aspects of personality--difficulty expressing anger, desire to feel liked, depression during diets--and about the value of personal support provided by groups like Overeaters Anonymous, more effective than the unindividualized competition of, say, Weight Watchers. His tone is friendly, his style conversational, his attitude insight-oriented, and he tosses in examples from the obesity clinic he directs. A good deal more palatable than last year's Reflections in a Goldfish Tank, this shies away from gimmickry (fad diets, medication, bypass surgery) and informally aligns itself with the more accepting self-help therapies, offering practical if warmed-over insights, including the central paradox ""we must accept ourselves as we are if we want to change ourselves constructively and permanently.

Pub Date: July 12th, 1978
Publisher: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan