TWO THOUSAND AND TEN DAYS OF HITLER by Patsy Ziemer
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TWO THOUSAND AND TEN DAYS OF HITLER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The founder of the American School in Berlin, ex-newspaperman, of Swedish descent, has a twelve year old daughter, most of whose life has been spent in Germany. This is her story of her experience under Hitler, from the last traditional German Christmas before he came into power, to their flight in June, 1939. It is a simple, straightforward, sometimes naive record, with interpolations of the facts behind the seemings contributed by her father. But she manages to bring out the contrasts, -- the agreeable, peaceful years of her earlier memories, and the petty persecutions in the school, the growing terrorism and Jewbaiting, the blind adherence to brutality as the Hitler regime mounts to the Munich crisis -- and war. Inside pictures of what the American colony experienced, stories of her Jewish schoolmates, of her German friends, of factories, schools, camps she visited, of household problems, and -- implicit in all of it, the effect of this on a young girl. The father's contribution gives the factual significance of incidents she experiences, his own experiences and investigations, trips to occupied territory, Nazi propaganda, organization, terror rule and the effect on daily life. Now in America, there's an exuberant sense of relief in all America offers. Patsy gives a good account of herself, without any of the smart alecky aspects of most children's narratives. Thoroughly readable and enlightening.

Pub Date: March 21st, 1940
Publisher: Harper