A warm blend of memoir, poetry, and Christian spirituality for dog owners.

READ REVIEW

WALKING WITH GOD AND MY DOG

A SPIRITUAL JOURNAL AND BIBLE EXPERIENCE

Retired English professor Miller converses with God while walking her pet in this prayer journal.

After the author adopted a beagle from an animal shelter, she started taking progressively longer walks with him. The four walks per day with Sam-Elliot (as she called him) provided her with opportunities for meditation that she’d never experienced before; she appreciated the beauty of nature, thought about her day, and asked God for guidance. In this work, she shares her insights with readers: “As all of us, you included, walk together, I invite you to join me and others to read sriptures, meditate, pray, reflect, and act on your faith.” This book is not a daily or weekly prayer journal, but rather a free-wheeling collection of short essays about various pets, Bible passages, and poems, with occasional spaces for readers to complete prompts or exercises related to prayer: “Think of activities or occasions that bring you special joy…..What about them brings you joy? Is God present at these events? Do you thank God for these blessings in your life?” In chapters organized around various stages of a dog walk (“Out the Door,” “Down the Alley,” and “Heading Home,” among others), Miller’s prose is soothing and encouraging. Her poetry, however, assumes a more formal rhythm and diction: “In God’s lush garden we are plants, / Free to grow and bloom. / We savor love that our Lord grants, / Spread blossom’s sweet perfume.” The hodgepodge approach means that not every item will appeal to everyone, although Christian readers who particularly enjoy dogs and poetry, of course, will most appreciate the whole package. Miller’s warm personality effectively knits the various pieces together, and it makes for a reading experience that’s both cheerful and seriously religious.

A warm blend of memoir, poetry, and Christian spirituality for dog owners.

Pub Date: May 21, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-973628-53-8

Page Count: 170

Publisher: Westbow Press

Review Posted Online: Oct. 3, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

If the authors are serious, this is a silly, distasteful book. If they are not, it’s a brilliant satire.

THE 48 LAWS OF POWER

The authors have created a sort of anti-Book of Virtues in this encyclopedic compendium of the ways and means of power.

Everyone wants power and everyone is in a constant duplicitous game to gain more power at the expense of others, according to Greene, a screenwriter and former editor at Esquire (Elffers, a book packager, designed the volume, with its attractive marginalia). We live today as courtiers once did in royal courts: we must appear civil while attempting to crush all those around us. This power game can be played well or poorly, and in these 48 laws culled from the history and wisdom of the world’s greatest power players are the rules that must be followed to win. These laws boil down to being as ruthless, selfish, manipulative, and deceitful as possible. Each law, however, gets its own chapter: “Conceal Your Intentions,” “Always Say Less Than Necessary,” “Pose as a Friend, Work as a Spy,” and so on. Each chapter is conveniently broken down into sections on what happened to those who transgressed or observed the particular law, the key elements in this law, and ways to defensively reverse this law when it’s used against you. Quotations in the margins amplify the lesson being taught. While compelling in the way an auto accident might be, the book is simply nonsense. Rules often contradict each other. We are told, for instance, to “be conspicuous at all cost,” then told to “behave like others.” More seriously, Greene never really defines “power,” and he merely asserts, rather than offers evidence for, the Hobbesian world of all against all in which he insists we live. The world may be like this at times, but often it isn’t. To ask why this is so would be a far more useful project.

If the authors are serious, this is a silly, distasteful book. If they are not, it’s a brilliant satire.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1998

ISBN: 0-670-88146-5

Page Count: 430

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 1998

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

Did you like this book?

more