SCIENCE AND RELIGION by Paul Chauchard

SCIENCE AND RELIGION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The same high level of erudition as in most of the other volumes in the 136 books now available in the Twentieth Century Encyclopedia of Catholicism (under the general editorship of the distinguished author and scholar, Henri Daniel-Ross) marks this latest edition to the series. Touching on an area of considerable conflict in history, Dr. Paul Chauchard manages at the same time to give an objective view of the controversies of the past. He looks forward to a new synthesis of these two areas since they really are not meant to be in conflict. The author divides his presentation into these elements: the use of science against religion, the separation of science and religion, and the reconciliation of science and religion. From the opening chapter in which he traces ""the story of a misunderstanding"" -- from Democritus to Tielhard de Chardin -- to his own conclusions in which he answers his own implied question in the title with an answer that neither excludes the other, Dr. Chauchard masterfully argues his case. Sometimes, though, familiarity with the select bibliography he supplies would be useful to fuller understanding of what he has to say. A welcome volume, whether bought as part of the Encyclopedia or independently.

Publisher: Hawthorn