GLENPORT, ILLINOIS by Paul D. Boles

GLENPORT, ILLINOIS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

From the more intense The Streak and Beggars in the Sun, this is an expansive, retrospective, but never really reflective story of a boyhood into manhood in the middle west. And once again this habitat seems to encourage what is presumably a semi-autobiographical anatomy of maturation; the native roots are deep- and so are early attachments. This is particularly true for Tone Grayleaf, who moves with his parents to Glenport, Illinois, when he is eleven. Along with the friendly acclimitization to the town, there is the acquisition of a brindle dog- and the long-enduring romance with Wanda. There is also his friendship with Rex, next door; his introduction to sex-by casual, warm-hearted Greta; the formation of a band- and the meeting with Connie, whom he will marry; and the war in which he will lose his life.... A sentimental Journey- the footprints are familiar- and so is Tone and all the experiences of his young life so that recognition rather than distinction is the cachet.

Pub Date: Jan. 3rd, 1955
Publisher: Macmillan