KAISER WAKES THE DOCTORS by Paul De Kruif

KAISER WAKES THE DOCTORS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

There are two factors to conjure with in this book, -- De Kruif's own reputation in the field of popularizing medical subjects, and the universal interest in anything to do with the already almost legendary Henry Kaiser. In this slim volume, De Krulf packs the whole message of cooperative medicine, dramatized through the extraordinary achievements of Dr. Sidney Garfield with the backing of Henry Kaiser. De Kruif first makes confession of his own apathy, his avoidance of the ""hot issue"" of cooperative medicine. He then traces the steps by which Dr. Garfield reached his present eminence,-first desert doctoring and the beginnings of a health plan for the men employed on the flood control project in California; the steps which led from clinical work in the field to a small model hospital the cost of which was amortized during the period of its existence; then the larger scale Grand Coulee plan which proved good economy on all counts; finally, backed by Kaiser, successive projects in Oakland, through the Permanente Foundation, working in connection with the Richmond and Vancouver yards. He makes no bones of the hurdles to be taken, of the active opposition on the part of organized medicine, of the penalty paid by the doctors and surgeons who came in on the project -- and of how, in California at least, ""Kaiser waked the doctors"" and the California Physicians Service plan grew to substantial proportions. As one eminent conservative in the profession exclaimed, ""It's the Oath of Hippocrates in action"". This little book may well serve to wake the public too -- and to supply a springboard for more thoughtful consideration of the future of cooperative medicine.

Pub Date: Sept. 9th, 1943
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace