RADIO AND THE PRINTED PAGE by Paul F. Lazarsfeld

RADIO AND THE PRINTED PAGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An infinitely meticulous study of the educational aspects of radio, in which Dr. Lazarsfeld, director of the Princeton studies on radio and the press, now continuing the research under the Rockefeller Foundation, comes to the conclusion that broadcasts in serious vein are falling to reach those who should be the natural audience. He analyzes the psychological character of the audiences. He shows various methods used in getting cultural material across, comparing types of programs and their effect on each other. He has collected data of all sorts, on many phases of radio, which should prove a veritable ""bible"" for building programs, for commercial and cultural reference. Not a book for the casual reader, but an important tool for those interested in getting their message across the air. Book shops, department stores, public libraries all feel that the radio is -- or should be -- a sound medium. This book should help make it so. In other words, this is not only a book to sell to special customers, but a book for your own shelf.

Pub Date: July 19th, 1940
ISBN: 1151806064
Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce