CIVIL LIBERTIES AND THE CONSTITUTION by Paul G. Kauper

CIVIL LIBERTIES AND THE CONSTITUTION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A very timely book in this explosive period of our history, dealing with the most significant problems coming before our Supreme Court. In a manner, it is a midway book; that is, a book for lawyers without the burden of too many references, and a book for laymen without the heaviness of legal jargon. The problem of church and state and the problem of censorship and civil liberty generally are handled satisfactorily, with an excellent analysis of the important and authoritative cases. The major issue before the Supreme Court is no longer private litigations as it was 100 or even 50 years ago. The problem before the Supreme Court now is the stateman's problem of interpreting and making effective the vague phrases of the Constitution such as ""due process"", ""liberty"", ""property"", ""equal justice"", and the author cites the recent cases dealing with civil rights that involved these vague phrases. No one can dispute the author's conclusion that the burden of protecting civil rights is too much for the Supreme Court to handle alone, and that Congress and the Executive Department must exert their power to enforce those that the Court has established as basic constitutional rights.

Publisher: Univ. of Michigan Press