THE TWO FACES OF APARTHEID by Paul Giniewski

THE TWO FACES OF APARTHEID

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A Bantustan sounds a lot like the carrot Black Muslims hold out to their congregations--a black state with its own government, industry, education system, etc. Many South Africans see the establishment of Bantustans as a solution to their racial crises and , after surveying that country and its problems, the French journalist who wrote this book came to the same conclusion. Giniewski's specialty is profiling whole nations and he has made himself an expert on Israel. His method is to research the history, economy and sociology of a country, to travel through it and to interview people in every social stratum at every level of involvement. His interviews are impressionistic and much the best part of the book. He believes he is persuasible because he goes equipped with an open mind. He took his open mindedness to South Africa, eschewing all moral or value judgments about aspects of apartheid until he had seen the problems for himself. One section of his mind seems tightly shut. He hasn't much use for the English and he is very critical of the small, vocal group of South Africans of English descent who think apartheid is wrong. He is inclined to yearn over the Dutch-descended Afrikaaner and finds their white supremacy claims and fears more reasonable than most commentators do. He is not clear about the series of social and economic revolutions that must be achieved within the proposed Bantustans-- equivalent to bringing the Bantus from the Stone Age up to the Scientific Revolution-- but he enthusiastically endorses the idea as a real challenge for them. It's another viewpoint not often aired here and not likely to be a popular one. This data was gathered and the interviewing done in 1961.

Publisher: Regnery