THE COMMANCHEROS by Paul L. Wellman

THE COMMANCHEROS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

a vigorous biographical novel of Jim Bowie, showed Wellman in a new guise, quite different from the analytical dissector of souls in The Chain. Now in this new novel, he is exploring again some of the rich background of the struggle for the southwest, the determination of the frontiersmen of the new reaches of Texas to prove that peace on the borders could be secured. Here, in the story of a self-exiled New Orleans gambler and dueller, is told an episode of the newly organized Texas Rangers, and particularly of a derring do exploit (which, as Wellman said, might have happened), a tiny nucleus set out to unearth the dreaded Commancheros, brains of the ghastly Commanche raids that were spreading terror on the frontier, threatening the security of Texas. An adventure tale, slighter in substance and scope than most of Wellman's books, but good escape reading for the Western fans who want something in the genre but more rewarding, better written.

Pub Date: Nov. 18th, 1952
Publisher: Doubleday