CAREERS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE by Paul Sarnoff

CAREERS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Educational requirements and financial rewards--a fast look at the variety of vocational opportunities in the biological sciences which warns of the difficult task of keeping up with new developments. However, a summary division into plants, animals and microbes does a disservice to burgeoning molecular biology studies, and there is an undiscriminating grouping of teaching, research, management-administration, and ""maintenance"" (a relatively small field dealing with sanitation). The author acknowledges the advisability of two or three college degrees, also indicates how a job calling for a B.S. with four years' experience can pay more than a Ph.D. with none, also specifies the kind of work available to those with a high school diploma or even less schooling. Research pays more than teaching (and high school teaching in New York City pays more than college teaching in many places) and the government finances according to GS ratings. (There is nothing about government-university cooperations or recent outcries against such alliances.) Not the lifeblood story but a beginner for some, a complement to Fox's Careers in the Biological Sciences which ignores the remunerative aspects.

Pub Date: Oct. 21st, 1968
Publisher: Messner