THE DISENCHANTED UNIONIST by Paul Sultan

THE DISENCHANTED UNIONIST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Professor Sultan produced this excellent, original study under the auspices of the Fund for the Republic. His subject is the criticism to which organized labor has recently been subjected by its own ranks. His approach is unorthodox in the extreme, but he cautions his reader about the inherent limitations every step of the way, and it should be stated that much of this book's value is due precisely to the unusual methods employed. Selecting (haphazardly, but not as an intentional cross-section) fifty persons who had difficulties with their unions, he interviewed them at length and analyzed their charges in the light of personal as well as sociological, economic, and political values. Many of them are former union officials now active in the ""Right to Work"" movement; others are ""amateurs"" whose motives range from religious scruples to libertarian principles to obvious paranoic tendencies. So that all cases may be judged as far as possible on their own merits, the actual words of each person have been retained. Certainly no enemy of the union movement himself, Professor Sultan takes for his main point the need for ""the right of dissent and the worth of the individual"" in labor activity. He has built a splendidly particularized and unforgettable argument for this need, which deserves the serious attention of union critics and union supporters alike.

Publisher: Harper & Row