EXTRAORDINARY CHRISTIANITY: The Life and Thought of Alexander Vinet by Paul T. Fuhrmann

EXTRAORDINARY CHRISTIANITY: The Life and Thought of Alexander Vinet

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Alexander Vinet, called here ""the greatest French-speaking Protestant thinker since Calvin,"" was born near Lausanne in 1797, and although he died before his fiftieth year, the range, clarity, and depth of his theological thought and writing, as well as the qualities of the man as a person, made him a religious thinker and spokesman of wide and diverse influence. The author presents an opening chapter sketching his life; then examines the source of his thought, the new orientation Vinet gave to French Prostestantism, his vision of love and truth as expressed in the life of personal devotion, his estimate, somewhat pessimistic, of the modern civilization he saw taking form in his time, and other aspects of his wide and seminal thought. This book itself has the tone of matters long reflected upon and of sources fully digested. It should be of serious interest to church historians, but in style and interest may well attract lay readers. Professor John T. McNeill supplies an appreciative preface.

Pub Date: April 13th, 1964
Publisher: Westminster