MY SEARCH FOR ABSOLUTES by Paul Tillich
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MY SEARCH FOR ABSOLUTES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Paul Tillich was not only a giant of the ""new theology""; he was also, and primarily, a human being of almost heroic proportions--sympathetic, empathetic, wholly in tune with the needs of a world engaged almost exclusively in secular pursuits. His life, and his career as an intellectual seeking for the means to give meaning to those pursuits, are both admirably summed up in the phrase ""search for absolutes."" This autobiography--indeed an ""intellectual autobiography,"" as the publisher claims, but also a spiritual testament--is the story of that search, from its genesis in Tillich's childhood in old Brandenburg to its culmination in the theologian's formulation of the theory of the absolute and the relative in man's encounter with reality, in moral decisions, and in religion. It would be difficult to find a recent serious work of more basic importance, literary charm, or beguiling simplicity than this book; in effect it embodies everything which was best in Tillich. The book is too personal, perhaps, to be categorized as Tillich's most important work, but it is undoubtedly the warmest, the most human, and the one which will finally bring Tillich to the audience he deserves.

Pub Date: Oct. 13th, 1967
Publisher: Simon & Schuster