THE HIGHER LEARNING IN AMERICA: A Reassessment by Paul Woodring

THE HIGHER LEARNING IN AMERICA: A Reassessment

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Woodring's comments on our institutions of higher learning are, to put it charitably, platitudinous. Some colleges are co-ed, some not; some denominational, sone non-; some public, some private. . . . To put it critically, his further remarks are ridiculous: lest the state college be slighted, it must be noted that ""these unheralded institutions are the alma maters of several million Americans, one of whom is President of the U.S."" Present students include New Leftists, who ""believe that the U.S. is still a colonial power, led by evil men,"" and hippies who force a flower into the hand of the policemen who arrest them. . . in case you haven't heard. Gut issues of rules, structure and content are notable chiefly by their absence or equally vapid treatment. It's hard to imagine who Will read the book, but it's even harder to conclude who can profit by it, except Ivy Leaguers, who might perhaps relish the overemphasis despite a disclaimer of their superiority.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1968
Publisher: McGraw-Hill