LET'S TALK SENSE ABOUT OUR SCHOOLS by Paul Woodring
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LET'S TALK SENSE ABOUT OUR SCHOOLS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A stimulating evaluation of education which if less combative than Albert Lynd's Quackery in the Public Schools (Little, Brown- p. 417) is also in many ways more constructive and brings to the heat of controversy (which is more often confusion) a cool appraisal of our teachers- and schools today. Distinguishing between basic policy (which is the public's concern) and techniques (which should be left to the professionals), Woodring discusses the changes in contemporary education- not all of which can be attributed to Dewey- the increased population and attendance, the extension of education upward. The lengthening shadow of Dewey (a hazy outline for the most part) and the progressives which have gotten out of hand; the teachers' college (low man on the educational totem pole) and if we have poor faculties, you can look for the answer in inadequate salaries; the American teacher, and what makes a good one; the fundamentals and the frills- and the place of the 3 R's; and that other loaded word- discipline; academic freedom, free enterprise, a philosophy of education, all this provides a reasoned and temperate examination which is both a critique and a defense (the Lynd book is only the former). A wide audience of concerned to alarmed parents, as well as teachers, will find this edifying and often entertaining.

Pub Date: May 30th, 1953
Publisher: McGraw-Hill