REVOLUTION IN HUNGARY by Paul Zinner

REVOLUTION IN HUNGARY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Six crammed chapters of Hungarian history share this book with eight intimately detailed chapters on the strangest revolution that ever died a-borning. In many ways Revolution in Hungary is the most important book in this group because it is most specific about the length of Russian patience and the deviousness of Russian strategy. Zinner has apparently interviewed numerous persons who were involved on both sides of the fracas. In addition to remarking upon the failure of the West to capitalize on moments of Communist indecision, he questions the American policy of building up false hopes among the captive nations. He exposes with surgical skill the fundamental interior contradictions of Marxism leninism as applied to countries with any amount of historical cohesion. He cites the repeated complete failure of the planned economy. He wastes little energy on regrets, but inquires after a possible change in Free World opinion to prevent any further opportunities from slipping by, and calls for revised strategy to seek out weak spots in the Soviet perimeter.

Pub Date: July 23rd, 1962
Publisher: Columbia Univ. Press