THE GIRL WHO SLIPPED THROUGH TIME by Paula Hendrich

THE GIRL WHO SLIPPED THROUGH TIME

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KIRKUS REVIEW

On a wasteland expedition with her father in a rationalistic, plastic 21st century, the girl--named Paramecia, from her mother's lab work!--slipa through a mist and into rural Kansas, 1934, where she is taken in by an animal-loving little boy and his unschooled but wise, ecology-minded adoptive granny. There is much agony and outrage over less enlightened, bloodthirsty neighbors who beat and shoot animals. Paramecia knows from history and hex father's insistent teaching that a Great Eco-War is on the way, and when in the end she returns to her own time, she has a lot more sympathy for her parents' dedicated commitments to what is left of nature. The heavily drawn issues and stereotyped characters make this silly enough, but then it turns out that folksy old granny with her ungrammatical lectures about crimes against the environment is really from outer space--a revelation that contributes nothing but the implication that such common sense is not to be found among earthlings.

Pub Date: March 14th, 1978
Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard