FIRE FROM THE FOUNTAINS by Pauline Innis

FIRE FROM THE FOUNTAINS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

This memoir of life during World War II manages some humorous moments and some very effective scenes for all its British jiggery-pokery. The author was a Devonshire lass doing her bit for the home team during the early days ""of glorious defeats but only small victories."" Her ""war effort"" was Ernestine, the pristine pig with the ""sad blue eyes"" and while Granny cleaned jam jars and bones, Aunt Lizzie coped and neighbor Tyrana kept the garden club in bloom, Pauline urged Ernestine toward motherhood. Unfortunately, Ernestine came up with an astonishing singlet and the family was accused of placing the other piglets on the black market. In the meantime there were other contentions--Algy with the mysterious weak blood who might be a spy; the desperate placing of ""holiday children"" (handicapped--retarded) into homes from bombed-out institutions; the arrival of wounded. Jonathan who describes the heroism and the horror of a scene that saved his life and Collette the hostile displaced French girl who is finally won over by a most unusual gift. Fire From the Fountains of memory--a warm reminiscence.

Pub Date: Aug. 7th, 1968
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World