The investigator’s second outing is even more muscular than his debut, as Rowson edges her detective puzzles ever closer to...

DANGEROUS CARGO

Ex-commando Art Marvik (Silent Running, 2015) tracks down the killer of a man who died twice.

DNA evidence shows that the body washed up on the Isle of Wight belonged to Bradley Pulford, who had worked for fishermen Adam and Matthew Killbeck before vanishing in 1990 . But according to Detective Superintendent Philip Crowder of the National Intelligence Marine Squad, Pulford died in Singapore in 1959 in an accident aboard the freighter Leonora. So Crowder sends Marvik, along with fellow former Marine Shaun Strathen, to investigate the connection between the Killbecks, a Dorset fishing family, and a seaman killed in Asia. The trail is immediately complicated by Sarah Redburn, who’s looking for her father, Oscar, a marine archaeologist who disappeared from the Dorset coast in 1979 while looking for fossils. A picture shows Oscar with a group of students rallying in support of a local dockworkers’ strike—a group that includes Bradley Pulford. When Sarah is killed the morning after meeting Marvik, his antennae begin to quiver. And when Sarah’s roommate, actress Bryony Darrow, is burned out of her house on London’s Eel Pie Island, the ex-Marine goes full-throttle against a gang of villains as ruthless as they are deadly.

The investigator’s second outing is even more muscular than his debut, as Rowson edges her detective puzzles ever closer to thriller territory.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-7278-8626-2

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Severn House

Review Posted Online: June 19, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2016

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Amateurish, with a twist savvy readers will see coming from a mile away.

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THE SILENT PATIENT

A woman accused of shooting her husband six times in the face refuses to speak.

"Alicia Berenson was thirty-three years old when she killed her husband. They had been married for seven years. They were both artists—Alicia was a painter, and Gabriel was a well-known fashion photographer." Michaelides' debut is narrated in the voice of psychotherapist Theo Faber, who applies for a job at the institution where Alicia is incarcerated because he's fascinated with her case and believes he will be able to get her to talk. The narration of the increasingly unrealistic events that follow is interwoven with excerpts from Alicia's diary. Ah, yes, the old interwoven diary trick. When you read Alicia's diary you'll conclude the woman could well have been a novelist instead of a painter because it contains page after page of detailed dialogue, scenes, and conversations quite unlike those in any journal you've ever seen. " 'What's the matter?' 'I can't talk about it on the phone, I need to see you.' 'It's just—I'm not sure I can make it up to Cambridge at the minute.' 'I'll come to you. This afternoon. Okay?' Something in Paul's voice made me agree without thinking about it. He sounded desperate. 'Okay. Are you sure you can't tell me about it now?' 'I'll see you later.' Paul hung up." Wouldn't all this appear in a diary as "Paul wouldn't tell me what was wrong"? An even more improbable entry is the one that pins the tail on the killer. While much of the book is clumsy, contrived, and silly, it is while reading passages of the diary that one may actually find oneself laughing out loud.

Amateurish, with a twist savvy readers will see coming from a mile away.

Pub Date: Feb. 5, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-250-30169-7

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Celadon Books

Review Posted Online: Nov. 4, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2018

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KILLING FLOOR

From the Jack Reacher series , Vol. 1

Welcome to Margrave, Georgia—but don't get too attached to the townsfolk, who are either in on a giant conspiracy, or hurtling toward violent deaths, or both. There's not much of a welcome for Jack Reacher, a casualty of the Army's peace dividend, who's drifted into town idly looking for traces of a long-dead black jazzman. Not only do the local cops arrest him for murder, but the chief of police turns eyewitness to place him on the scene, even though Reacher was getting on a bus in Tampa at the time. Two surprises follow: The murdered man wasn't the only victim, and he was Reacher's brother Joe, whom he hadn't seen in seven years. So Reacher, who so far hasn't had anything personally against the crooks who set him up for a weekend in the state pen at Warburton, clicks into overdrive. Banking on the help of the only two people in Margrave he can trust—a Harvard-educated chief of detectives who hasn't been on the job long enough to be on the take, and a smart, scrappy officer who's taken him to her bed—he sets out methodically in his brother's footsteps, trying to figure out why his cellmate in Warburton, a panicky banker whose cell-phone number turned up in Joe's shoe, confessed to a murder he obviously didn't commit; trying to figure out why all the out-of- towners on Joe's list of recent contacts were as dead as he was; and trying to stop the local carnage, or at least direct it in more positive ways. Though the testosterone flows as freely as printer's ink, Reacher is an unobtrusively sharp detective in his quieter moments—not that there are many of them to judge by. Despite the crude, tough-naif narration, debut novelist Child serves up a big, rangy plot, menace as palpable as a ticking bomb, and enough battered corpses to make an undertaker grin.

Pub Date: March 17, 1997

ISBN: 0-399-14253-3

Page Count: 368

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1997

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