PORTRAIT OF A MARRIAGE by Pearl Buck

PORTRAIT OF A MARRIAGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In this section solely on Pearl Buck's name. By any other name -- it would be washed up on the shores a not-too-good renter. Red Book one shot expanded -- and not worth it. Corn, old style calender chromo, a tale of a rich man's son, a might-have-been-very-good artist, who falls in love with the farmer's daughter who inspired his best painting. Yes -- and marries the girl, thrusting behind him the fashion and furbelows of his plush Philadelphia -- presumably Main Line -- life, cutting himself off from the approval of his utooratic mother and aristocratic father and the girl who wanted him as her own. He does not become a farmer -- oh no -- he goes on painting less and less inspired things -- and lives on the bounty of his Pennsylvania-Dutch farmer father-in-law, and the earth-rooted inspiration of his wife, who cannot adapt herself by jot or tittle to his way of life, but who grows lovelier with advancing years against her chosen background. William never comes to life, either in his marriage, his art, or his children. The only son, a drifter, marries a French chippy after World War one daughter marries the son of the neighboring farmer; the other -- adapted by the woman from his past who has never forgotten him, becomes a famous singer. Cardboard figures -- marionette action -- and not even good at that. Only her name will sell it.

Pub Date: Nov. 29th, 1945
Publisher: John Day