RTS AND FLOWERS by Peggy Wood

RTS AND FLOWERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Peggy Wood's rambling reminiscences of theatre and life in the theatre in America and abroad serve to cast the limelight on the fate of the performing arts in our time as much as upon herself. You remember ""Mama"", eight years on live TV (the only kind, to her mind), and here she is out of character and on her own. She recalls an audience with King Haakon, a privilege earned along with the Order of St. laf; visits Hollywood on a late toot as Naomi in The Song of Ruth (""As far as Hollywood is concerned, I guess I'm just put up with Scotch tape""); talks of the World War II years spent touring in Blithe Spirit (""Noel let them laugh at death!""). Her 1960 ""festival crawl"" in Yugoslavia (Hamlet on the ramparts), Greece, Scotland, England and elsewhere raised distress over our lack of repertory theatre and spotty hespian breeding grounds. As a good citizen and ANTA president, Miss Wood (Mrs. alling) discusses the Federal Advisory Council of the Arts, defeated in 1961, tax remittance, the International Cultural Exchange Service (ANTA-sponsored, now under he State Department); as a performing artist, her rise ""from Dormouse to Clytemestra in 62 years"", as a wife, the needlepoint vest she made for her husband and which he wore on Person-to-Person. Engaging.

Pub Date: Sept. 11th, 1963
Publisher: Morrow