WHAT IVAN KNOWS THAT JOHNNY DOESN'T by

WHAT IVAN KNOWS THAT JOHNNY DOESN'T

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Based on the author's study of curricula and textbooks in Soviet and American public schools this book proposes to show that not only are American schools lagging behind Russian schools in teaching the sciences but in the area of the humanities as well. He makes comparisons in the fields of reading, literature, foreign languages, history and geography and finds that, for example, in the reading program for the first four grades the content and vocabulary of Soviet readers are far superior to American readers which he considers ""insipid, trivial and devoid of either pleasure or profit"". In each of the areas he chooses to deal with the author concludes that Soviet students are better trained than their American counterparts and that this superiority is a characteristic of European education in general -- especially in the field of foreign languages. His suggestions for improvement are : a strengthening the curriculum and intensifying the quality of textbooks. He does not deal at any length with the presumable cause of the trouble -- the prevailing philosophy of education; but as a factual report the book should certainly be read by educators.

Pub Date: Nov. 13th, 1961
Publisher: Random House