BEARS IN THE FAMILY by Peter Erott

BEARS IN THE FAMILY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

When Dr. Krott prepared to study the disappearing Alpine bear at close hand, he had to turn to a zoo in order to obtain cubs. ""Bumsli"" and ""Sepha"" joined the doctor's wife and two sons as part of his family-- but not as pets. Dr. Krott became their ""Mother"". In order to approximate their natural habitat, he lived with them in an isolated Alpine hut. Woofing and growing like a concerned bear mother, Dr. Krott passed on all the bear knowledge he had and as much discipline as the cubs could take. For the rest, they taught him what little is known about the Alpine bear in the wild state-- development, behavior, diet and hibernation. Alpine villages near the hut saw the bears as a possible tourist attraction. Life became hideous with interruptions and cameras. The bears did not fear people and their growth (cuddly though they looked) endangered the lives of the ignorant who approached familiarly. ""Bumsli"" and ""Sepha"" end in a bear pit and Dr. Krott is resigned to the disappearance of their kind in crowded Central and Northern Europe. The full page photographs, costly in color, will have great eye appeal for animal lovers. The translation from the German is excellent; Dr. Krott's text is clear and simply written. For the Elsa and Ring of Bright Water audience.

Pub Date: Feb. 21st, 1963
Publisher: Dutton