PETER FREUCHEN'S BOOK OF THE ESKIMOS by Peter Freuchen

PETER FREUCHEN'S BOOK OF THE ESKIMOS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Inhabitants of temperate climes have been fascinated by Eskimos since the two types first made contact. How, one wonders, is it possible to get along under the primitive conditions of Eskimo existence? Peter Freuchen, a spirited man who found the Arctic wildernesses suited to his taste, amassed more information about the Eskimo mode of life than anyone else of his generation. He wrote about them from every possible angle; his book is virtually an encyclopedia. Because he lived among them for many years (his first wife was an Eskimo and their children were raised in traditional fashion) he developed a great sensitivity to the meaning of their culture. His anecdotes about the relationship of old people to the community, a countless fund of comical stories about being outwitted by craftier hunters, and many charming recollections of the days when the Arctic was as yet unspoiled by depredations of trappers are among the highlights. A few vignettes are duplicated from another recent book (Peter Freuchen's Adventures in the Arctic, Julian Messner, 190), edited and completed by his second wife, Dagmar, but most are new and not found elsewhere.

Publisher: World