SEVEN BY CHANCE: THE ACCIDENTAL PRESIDENTS by Peter Levin

SEVEN BY CHANCE: THE ACCIDENTAL PRESIDENTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Inspired by the fact that this is an election year, this review of seven men who rose from practically anonymous positions as vice-presidents to the Presidency calls attention to the importance of the office, the necessity of choosing a worthy candidate rather than a tool of national committees. In detail the accessions of Tyler, Fillmore, Johnson, Arthur, Roosevelt, Coolidge and Truman, there is a careful survey of the situations into which they were thrust, their accession to power, the use they made of it. He further analyzes the constitutional device which is so often a deadend for political candidates but which when fate plays a hand, too often produces a personality ill-equipped to meet the challenge. Here are the measures and statures of the men, their relationship to their times, their dealings with Congress, the employment of their powers and their total effect on the nation. Worthwhile in its deliberation of the importance of the position, interesting in its material, useful in its collection.

Pub Date: June 21st, 1948
Publisher: Farrar, Straus