A PLACE WITHOUT TWILIGHT by Peter S. Feibleman

A PLACE WITHOUT TWILIGHT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This story of the Morrises, a family of New Orleans Negroes, takes place before, during, and just after World War II, and is told by the daughter, Lucille. The theme is double- barrelled, the first part being, naturally, racial, and the second dealing with the effect of a dominant, overprotective, and fear filled mother as she crushes her husband, and especially as she ruins the lives of her two sons. Lucille is of tougher stuff than her brothers and her mother never gets the same kind of hold over her. Lucille learns on her own the value of love, of independence, and of freedom and thus escapes the hate and fear that have governed her mother and made her unfit in coping with the world. The novel is often gripping and moving and Mr. Feibleman writes well once you get used to his idea of how to write southern Negro dialect. Still, given all of the elements of strength and power, it does not have the full cumulative effect it should. It is a first novel- presumably- and the author is someone to watch.

Publisher: World