SHIPWRECKS AND ARCHAEOLOGY by Peter Throckmorton

SHIPWRECKS AND ARCHAEOLOGY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

If land archaeology has reached manhood, then underwater archaeology is barely a toddler. And with about as much direction and control, contends Peter Throckmorton in this passionate account of a dangerous and dramatic art. If 19th century amateurs plundered tombs and destroyed sites, their latter-day counterparts, equipped with aqualungs are all too often destroying wrecks and ruining whatever was salvaged through ignorance or carelessness. At the same time serious archaeologists are thwarted by governmental policies which will allow some native activity but xenophobically refuse to grant privileges to foreign academics. It is a sad bitter story, documented with numerous accounts of arrests. To be particularly recommended is the fine account of the sinking of the Nautilus in the 19th century, the colorful description of the early sponge divers who discovered the Antikythera wreck, and very good discussions of what happens to materials and man when exposed to seawater at great depths.

Publisher: Little, Brown--A.M.P.