THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS

A PIÑATA FOR THE PIÑON TREE

The words of the traditional Christmas song are adapted here to reflect a Southwest theme, with influences from Latino and Native-American cultures. On the first day of Christmas, a grandmotherly animal of undetermined species looks out her kitchen window to see her amigos bringing her a piñata for her piñon tree. The three friends (a skunk, a pig and an armadillo) bring in more decorations and more animals as the days of celebration progress, right on up to an 11-member mariachi band and 12 raccoons drumming. Wolff’s busy, brilliantly colorful illustrations depict the huge cast of characters slowly filling up the town square as they celebrate. An additional illustration on the left fourth of each double-paged spread holds the text and shows the hands (paws?) of the grandmotherly animal baking Bizcochitos cookies step-by-step. That simpler scene helps to set off a calm spot on the pages. A recipe for these cookies and the music to the song with the rewritten words can be found on the endpapers, though those will be partially covered by the book jacket in library use. The final scene, a double page of glowing windows set in snowy mountains and facing the sparkling tree, is just plain breathtaking. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2007

ISBN: 978-0-316-82323-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2007

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The tips garnered here could be used to scare just about anyone, and for those scared of ghosts, at least your carpets will...

HOW TO SCARE A GHOST

From the How To... series

Reagan and Wildish continue their How to… series with this Halloween-themed title.

If you’ve ever had a hankering to scare a ghost, this handbook is what you need. In it, a pair of siblings shows readers “how to attract a ghost” (they like creepily carved pumpkins and glitter), identify a ghost (real ghosts “never, ever open doors”), and scare a ghost (making faces, telling scary stories). Also included is a warning not to go too far—a vacuum is over-the-top on the scary chart for ghosts. Once you’ve calmed your ghost again, it’s time to play (just not hide-and-seek or on a trampoline) and then decide on costumes for trick-or-treating. Your ghost will also need to learn Halloween etiquette (knocking instead of floating through doors). The title seems a little misleading considering only two spreads are dedicated to trying to scare a ghost, but the package as a whole is entertaining. Wildish’s digital cartoon illustrations are as bright as ever, and the brother and sister duo have especially expressive faces. Both are white-presenting, as are all the other characters except for some kids in the very last spread.

The tips garnered here could be used to scare just about anyone, and for those scared of ghosts, at least your carpets will be clean from all the vacuuming. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Aug. 21, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5247-0190-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: July 16, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2018

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SCAREDY SQUIRREL HAS A BIRTHDAY PARTY

From the Scaredy Squirrel series , Vol. 5

When Scaredy Squirrel plans a party, he concentrates on maximum security, not maximum fun. His checklist: "Confirm date of birth; pick a safe location; choose party colors; get tuxedo dry-cleaned; prepare cake recipe; practice breathing (to blow up balloons/blow out candles); mail party invitation to myself." That's right—there’s only one guest at Scaredy's birthday party, and it's himself. But when his chum Buddy sends him a birthday card, he reconsiders his guest list to include his pal, even making the momentous decision to hold his party on the ground instead of in his tree. Replete with the lists and diagrams that are this OCD rodent's hallmarks, the story unfolds with both humor and some useful etiquette tips. From conversational gambits (good: "If you were a tree, what type of tree would you be?"; bad: "Is that a muskrat on your head? Oops... it's a toupee") to the "dos and don'ts of partying" (do: sit quietly; don't: double-dip), kids will find much to laugh at and think about. Typically (for a Scaredy adventure), despite a plan so complete it includes tooth-brushing breaks, a surprise happens—party animals show up! Watt’s wry digital illustrations make the most of the perceived mayhem, using a host of graphic conventions to tell her story. There's no question it's a formula by now, but it's still a winning one. Many happy returns, Scaredy. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-55453-468-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Kids Can

Review Posted Online: Jan. 31, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2011

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