LYNDON B. JOHNSON AND THE WORLD by Philip Geyelin
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LYNDON B. JOHNSON AND THE WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The ultimate importance of this book is difficult to assess -- but it serves a significant purpose. The years, brief as they are, of LBJ's incumbency, have been packed with events of world wide significance: the UN operation in the Congo; the aftermath of the Cuban crisis; the worsening situation between India and Pakistan; the Panama Canal Zone issue; the flareup of the Cyprian situation; the Pathet Lao land grabs; the rocky road of the O.A.S.-- and Vietnam -- to mention only a few. The author achieves an extraordinarily successful overall picture which falls into two main categories. It is a perceptive, objective portrait of Lyndon B. Johnson, the man, the vice president, the president, and the emerging world figure. Neither advocates nor opponents will be unreservedly pleased. He has managed to convey a somewhat schizophrenic picture -- which undoubtedly hits close to the truth. But he does show Johnson in action and manifesting growth and development. In so doing, he projects Johnson against the background of what has happened, what is happening, and how American involvement in the world scene stands today. It is as timely as the morning's headlines, with the added asset of setting acts within the framework of one man's personality and history.... Do not overlook this, as an excellent base study for club groups, League of Women Voters foreign policy committees, etc. It will inevitably date but for the moment is useful.

Pub Date: June 9th, 1966
Publisher: Praeger