THE FRESNO INCIDENT

A terrorist attack shakes Fresno, and Jake Lewis is left to mourn the woman of his dreams—or is he?

When Jake meets beautiful singer Sasha, his life changes irrevocably. But then the city of Fresno suffers a mysterious and tragic terrorist attack, dubbed “The Fresno Incident,” and Sasha is nowhere to be found. Jake is left adrift, wondering if his lover was killed in the attack or merely disappeared in its aftermath, and sets out to find the answers. Meanwhile, a fellowship of wealthy, well-connected men, led by reclusive billionaire Duke Chancellor, gets involved in the search and the stakes are raised. The story, told in action-packed bursts as it speeds through different characters and cities, weaves together the search for those responsible for the Fresno Incident with Jake’s search for resolution. The reader will hang on through more than 400 pages waiting for the outcome to unfold. With such an extensive cast of characters and plot, Rettew breaks the action into more than 80 short chapters, which effectively organize the novel’s myriad characters and conflicts. Each chapter begins by marking the date and location of the current action, helping readers keep track of the book’s various subplots that traverse the globe. The structure of the novel itself reflects its sprawling storyline, echoing the effects terrorist incidents can have all over the world. In the midst of all the threads that hold together Rettew’s novel, the author is sure to provide frequent updates on the lives of its two central characters. This serves to keep readers not only intellectually engaged in the clever plotting, but emotionally engaged in its characters as well. A plot-heavy, action-filled read that thrills with international intrigue.  

 

Pub Date: Dec. 30, 2011

ISBN: 978-1467073042

Page Count: 536

Publisher: AuthorHouse

Review Posted Online: April 17, 2012

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Anyone who believes in true love or is simply willing to accept it as the premise of a winding tale will find this debut an...

ONE DAY IN DECEMBER

True love flares between two people, but they find that circumstances always impede it.

On a winter day in London, Laurie spots Jack from her bus home and he sparks a feeling in her so deep that she spends the next year searching for him. Her roommate and best friend, Sarah, is the perfect wing-woman but ultimately—and unknowingly—ends the search by finding Jack and falling for him herself. Laurie’s hasty decision not to tell Sarah is the second painful missed opportunity (after not getting off the bus), but Sarah’s happiness is so important to Laurie that she dedicates ample energy into retraining her heart not to love Jack. Laurie is misguided, but her effort and loyalty spring from a true heart, and she considers her project mostly successful. Perhaps she would have total success, but the fact of the matter is that Jack feels the same deep connection to Laurie. His reasons for not acting on them are less admirable: He likes Sarah and she’s the total package; why would he give that up just because every time he and Laurie have enough time together (and just enough alcohol) they nearly fall into each other’s arms? Laurie finally begins to move on, creating a mostly satisfying life for herself, whereas Jack’s inability to be genuine tortures him and turns him into an ever bigger jerk. Patriarchy—it hurts men, too! There’s no question where the book is going, but the pacing is just right, the tone warm, and the characters sympathetic, even when making dumb decisions.

Anyone who believes in true love or is simply willing to accept it as the premise of a winding tale will find this debut an emotional, satisfying read.

Pub Date: Oct. 16, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-525-57468-2

Page Count: 400

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: July 31, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2018

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Packed with riveting drama and painful truths, this book powerfully illustrates the devastation of abuse—and the strength of...

IT ENDS WITH US

Hoover’s (November 9, 2015, etc.) latest tackles the difficult subject of domestic violence with romantic tenderness and emotional heft.

At first glance, the couple is edgy but cute: Lily Bloom runs a flower shop for people who hate flowers; Ryle Kincaid is a surgeon who says he never wants to get married or have kids. They meet on a rooftop in Boston on the night Ryle loses a patient and Lily attends her abusive father’s funeral. The provocative opening takes a dark turn when Lily receives a warning about Ryle’s intentions from his sister, who becomes Lily’s employee and close friend. Lily swears she’ll never end up in another abusive home, but when Ryle starts to show all the same warning signs that her mother ignored, Lily learns just how hard it is to say goodbye. When Ryle is not in the throes of a jealous rage, his redeeming qualities return, and Lily can justify his behavior: “I think we needed what happened on the stairwell to happen so that I would know his past and we’d be able to work on it together,” she tells herself. Lily marries Ryle hoping the good will outweigh the bad, and the mother-daughter dynamics evolve beautifully as Lily reflects on her childhood with fresh eyes. Diary entries fancifully addressed to TV host Ellen DeGeneres serve as flashbacks to Lily’s teenage years, when she met her first love, Atlas Corrigan, a homeless boy she found squatting in a neighbor’s house. When Atlas turns up in Boston, now a successful chef, he begs Lily to leave Ryle. Despite the better option right in front of her, an unexpected complication forces Lily to cut ties with Atlas, confront Ryle, and try to end the cycle of abuse before it’s too late. The relationships are portrayed with compassion and honesty, and the author’s note at the end that explains Hoover’s personal connection to the subject matter is a must-read.

Packed with riveting drama and painful truths, this book powerfully illustrates the devastation of abuse—and the strength of the survivors.

Pub Date: Aug. 2, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-5011-1036-8

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Atria

Review Posted Online: May 31, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2016

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